The Pronoun Statement will be the guiding force for our campus community to begin the work on integrating and normalizing the practice of sharing pronouns, learning about pronouns that exist outside of the binary of our gendered language, and to foster an environment where our LGBTQ+ students, faculty, and staff feel welcomed and respected on campus. This will also benefit non-CSU individuals, including alumni, donors, vendors, and recruiters. 

Pronouns & Events

The Pronoun Statement is not required to be read or shared aloud at events, unless doing so fits the tone and purpose of the event itself. In lieu of reading the full statement, it is recommended that pronouns be included in the following ways to create an environment of inclusion:

  • Speakers: Share pronouns as part of a speaker introduction, if comfortable. Examples: 
    • Hello, my name is Cam the Ram, he/him/his… 
    • Introducing Cam the Ram, they/them/theirs, from Colorado State University 
    • Welcome to CSU, I am Joyce McConnell, President of Colorado State University, I use she/her/hers pronouns 
  • Event Materials: On event registration forms, provide an opportunity to identify pronouns if name tags will be printed for attendees at an event. If blank name tags are provided, encourage the use of pronouns by displaying an example name tag with this inclusion.
  • Event Promotions: Link to this website (pronouns.colostate.edu) for additional guidance and information as appropriate

Pronouns & Students

The Pronoun Statement is not required to be read or shared aloud at student-centric events or spaces, unless doing so fits the tone and purpose of the program itself. In lieu of reading the full statement, it is recommended that pronouns be included in the following ways to create an environment of inclusion:

  • Name Tags: provide a space for students to write their pronouns on name tags. Use an example name tag to encourage pronoun usage.
  • Group Introductions: Share pronouns as group facilitators as an example to invite others to do the same, if comfortable. Example script:
    • “Welcome to our meeting. Before we begin, we’d like to go around and share our names and pronouns. For those who haven’t done this before, sharing pronouns is a way that we can avoid assumptions about our identities, particularly regarding gender. If you don’t understand what I’m asking, or if you are uncomfortable sharing or unable to participate in a respectful way, it’s okay to just share your name.”
  • Small Groups: Small groups are a great space to discuss the use of pronouns and to provide more context. Sharing this website (pronouns.colostate.edu) or showing the Pronoun Statement video can provide opportunities for learning and deeper understanding. Providing context for why sharing pronouns matter in connection with the Principles of Community or using language from the Pronoun Statement can also be helpful:
    • We often ascribe pronouns to individuals they may or may not use. Assuming identities based on observation or stereotype can result in unintended harm by using the wrong pronouns, misgendering, or potentially outing someone. Referring to someone by pronouns they use is one way to demonstrate respect for them as a person. 
    • Respect is included in our Principles of Community. As such, we support and encourage those who choose to share their pronouns in professional and academic spaces, including wherever names are provided, such as meeting and classroom introductions, name badges, email signatures, and course syllabi. By creating space for people who choose to share their pronouns, we foster an inclusive culture that is welcoming for all. 
  • Model Pronoun Usage: Remind students that it is okay to make mistakes as long as the action is followed up with accountability. If you forget a student’s pronouns, model asking the student one-on-one with language like “I want to honor your pronouns, can you please share them with me?”
  • Making Mistakes: If you accidentally use the wrong pronouns for a student, correct yourself immediately, if possible. Don’t center your own feelings in the situation or put unwanted attention on the person. Simply correct yourself and continue forward. If you realize you misgendered someone after-the-fact, address the mistake one-on-one with the impacted party.  
    • Note that folks who do not use binary pronouns (she/her or he/him) may feel uncomfortable with correcting in the moment. If they have introduced their pronouns and someone misgenders them, be an ally and help correct in the moment. “Chris uses they/them pronouns” 
       

Pronouns & the Classroom

The Pronoun Statement is not required to be read or shared aloud in the classroom but it is encouraged, especially at the beginning of a new semester. Beyond reading the pronoun statement, instructors can include pronoun usage in the following ways:

  • Course Syllabi: Include information about pronoun usage in your course syllabi to help shape a classroom of inclusion from the start of the semester. Sample language for syllabi (PDF)
  • Group Introductions: Share pronouns as group facilitators as an example to invite others to do the same, if comfortable. Example script:
    • “Welcome to our meeting. Before we begin, we’d like to go around and share our names and pronouns. For those who haven’t done this before, sharing pronouns is a way that we can avoid assumptions about our identities, particularly regarding gender. If you don’t understand what I’m asking, or if you are uncomfortable sharing or unable to participate in a respectful way, it’s okay to just share your name.”
  • Small Groups: Small groups are a great space to discuss the use of pronouns and to provide more context. Sharing this website (pronouns.colostate.edu) or showing the Pronoun Statement video can provide opportunities for learning and deeper understanding. Providing context for why sharing pronouns matter in connection with the Principles of Community or using language from the Pronoun Statement can also be helpful:
    • We often ascribe pronouns to individuals they may or may not use. Assuming identities based on observation or stereotype can result in unintended harm by using the wrong pronouns, misgendering, or potentially outing someone. Referring to someone by pronouns they use is one way to demonstrate respect for them as a person. 
    • Respect is included in our Principles of Community. As such, we support and encourage those who choose to share their pronouns in professional and academic spaces, including wherever names are provided, such as meeting and classroom introductions, name badges, email signatures, and course syllabi. By creating space for people who choose to share their pronouns, we foster an inclusive culture that is welcoming for all. 
  • Model Pronoun Usage: Remind students that it is okay to make mistakes as long as the action is followed up with accountability. If you forget a student’s pronouns, model asking the student one-on-one with language like “I want to honor your pronouns, can you please share them with me?”
  • Making Mistakes: If you accidentally use the wrong pronouns for a student, correct yourself immediately, if possible. Don’t center your own feelings in the situation or put unwanted attention on the person. Simply correct yourself and continue forward. If you realize you misgendered someone after-the-fact, address the mistake one-on-one with the impacted party.  
    • Note that folks who do not use binary pronouns (she/her or he/him) may feel uncomfortable with correcting in the moment. If they have introduced their pronouns and someone misgenders them, be an ally and help correct in the moment. “Chris uses they/them pronouns” 
       

Pronouns & Meetings

The Pronoun Statement is not recommended to be read or shared aloud at meetings, unless doing so fits the tone and purpose of the meeting itself. In lieu of reading the full statement, it is recommended that pronouns be included in the following ways to create an environment of inclusion:

  • Group Introductions: Share pronouns as group facilitators as an example to invite others to do the same, if comfortable.
  • Virtual Meetings: Include pronouns in your name on Zoom, if comfortable. While setting up an online meeting, be sure to turn on the setting to allow participants to rename themselves to be able to display their pronouns as well.